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Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante. Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie.

Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat. Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio. Browse Collections About Login Help. Advanced search. Print Send Add Share. Item Data. Material Information Title: Associations between maternal depression and child social competence and display of problem behaviors a longitudinal investigation of direct, indirect and moderating effects Creator: Zapata, Lauren B Place of Publication: [Tampa, Fla.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between maternal depression during the first three years postpartum and child social competence and display of problem behaviors at first grade. The impact of several characteristics of maternal depression were examined including general exposure, timing of initial onset in the postpartum period, severity of symptoms along the trajectory of initial onset, and chronicity of symptoms. This study also explored the mediating and moderating influences of maternal sensitivity, as well as the moderating influence of exposure to nonmaternal care.

Results identified the first six months postpartum as a sensitive period of risk for depression initiation. Severity of symptoms was also found to be important.

In some instances depression alone did not increase risk for lower levels of social competence, but severity of symptoms above cut points indicating depression did. Chronic depression at 24 months rather than 36 months postpartum was found to pose the greatest magnitude of negative influence on outcome. Thesis: Thesis Ph.

Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references. General Note: Document formatted into pages; contains pages. General Note: Includes vita. Statement of Responsibility: by Lauren B.

Postcard Information Format: Book. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Document formatted into pages; contains pages. Includes vita. Forthofer, PhD. Mental health. Child development.Print Send Add Share. Notes Thesis: Thesis--University of Florida. Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references leaves General Note: Typescript. General Note: Vita. Statement of Responsibility: by Charles Herbert Jackman. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes.

Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. Green has helped the author a great deal in his efforts to complete this work. The author sincerely appreciates this guidance. He also wishes to thank Dr. Garvey and Dr. Hedinger for their helpful discussion about the dissertation.

David Doda, David Killian, E. Whit Ludington, George Sherouse, and Ken Cross were instrumental in providing assistance with computer problems and other dissertation-related work. The final manuscript was then typed and refined by Adele Koehler. The author is grateful to Adele for her prompt and professional assistance.

The author wishes to thank Joseph Pollack for aiding in editorial matters concerning the dissertation. A thorough reading and criticism of the dissertation by the author's committee including Dr. Green, Dr. Peterson, Dr. Bailey, Dr. Gottesman, and Dr. LeboDr.

Spatial and energetic aspects of electron energy deposition

Chameides, and Dr. Smith was extremely helpful. The author is especially grateful to his parents, Rev. Jackman, and to his sister, Kathi Jouvenat, for their encouragement and support throughout graduate school. Energy Deposition Techniques 5 B.

Brief Discussion of the Monte Carlo Calculation. First Random Number, R.

Sixth Random Number, Rg 67 6. Value of the Cutoff Energy, 2 eV 74 D.Editores Editors Ana Catarina G. Jordi Tresserras Juan Univ. The publication's mission is to share knowledge and skills gained from a scientific and applied research in Tourism, Hospitality and Catering, gradually putting together the research community of the three areas. The journal will have a semi-annual periodicity, both in October and April, in a digital format in order to reach a free worldwide distribution.

Languages Its international and multicultural scope will allow the publication of texts in Portuguese, English and Spanish. Papers will be accepted from authors in any country aiming to contribute to a relevant and helpful discussion to the development of tourism. Evaluation This publication intends to follow international standards of excellence, ensuring the quality of scientific papers through an anonymous review process blind referee by a scientific committee composed of external evaluators of prestigious higher education institutions and personalities both national and international.

Initially the Editorial Board reserves the right to reject papers that do not have quality enough or that are not relevant enough to the areas of the journal. The studies evaluated by the Editorial Board with quality and relevance to the areas of the publication will be sent to reviewers for blind referee. All papers submitted must be original, neutral, independent and plagiarism free, based on scientific facts.

Authors are responsible for their published papers. Works can be presented by professors, researchers, professionals and students from Tourism, Hospitality and Catering, among others. Bachelor and master students must have a teacher as co-author in order to submit a paper. Papers may focus on empirical research, literature reviews in specific areas or theoretical reflections. By submitting work for publication in the Tourism and Hospitality International Journal, the author accepts transferring copyright to the journal as well as the rights to their dissemination, including scientific databases and national and international repositories, always willing to share knowledge and skills gained from a scientific and applied research in Tourism, Hospitality and Catering, gradually approaching the research community of the three areas.

By submitting work the author also authorizes the Editorial Board to make formatting changes to it. The rejection of an article submitted for publication by the Editorial Board or Scientific implies the automatic return of copyright. Authors should submit the document "Copyright Form" available on the journal's website along with the scientific work. Papers must feel the scientific procedures, in order to facilitate the submission system and optimize the process for authors, reviewers and editorial staff.

The Tourism and Hospitality International Journal is available to receive papers from the academic and professional community.Age is found to interact with employment to affect the rate of self-reported recidivism: Those aged 27 or older are less likely to report crime and arrest when provided with marginal employment opportunities than when such opportunities are not provided.

Among young participants, those in their teens and early twenties, the experimental job treatment had little effect on crime. Work thus appears to be a. Because researchers typi- cally cannot assign people to these statuses, however, it is difficult to determine whether such transitions are causes or correlates of changes in offending.

In fact, early or "pre- cocious" transition to these adult roles ap- pears to worsen problem behavior Bachman. Versions of this paper were presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association in New York in and the 12th International Congress of Criminology in Seoul in Whether work is a turning point for offend- ers may also depend on other dimensions of time, such as the duration since release from prison.

This investigation takes up three questions about causality, age-dependence, and the timing of criminal recidivism. Does work cause a reduction in crime, or is the association spurious?

Do work effects de- pend on the life-course stage of offenders, or are they uniform across age groups? When are released offenders at greatest risk of recidivism? Work is important for theories of crime be- cause workers are likely to experience close and frequent contact with conventional oth- ers Warr and because the informal so- cial controls of the workplace encourage conformity Sampson and Laub In particular, life-course theories suggest that. Because employment is so clearly manipulable, work effects are amenable to both scientific study and policy analysis.

In fact, the provision of employment is one of few policy instruments at the state's disposal Wilson It is much simpler to place parolees into varying work statuses, for example, than to randomly assign them to different spouses, neighborhoods, or peer associates. For all of these reasons, studies of work effects on crime are prominent in the socio- logical literature Berk, Lenihan, and Rossi ; Crutchfield and Pitchford ; Hagan ; Sampson and Laub ; Thornberry and Christenson This re- search has established several basic empiri- cal findings.

First, the meaning of work and its implications for crime appear to change at some point during the transition to adult- hood: The bivariate association between employment and law violation is generally positive for juveniles Bachman and Schu- lenberg ; Gottfredson and Hirschi ; Mihalic and Elliott ; Ploeger ; Wright, Cullen, and Williamsbut negative for adults Farrington et al.

Second, a high incidence of short jobless spells, rather than long-term unemployment, characterizes the work his- tories of criminal offenders Cook ; Sullivan Although their earnings and employment levels are far below those of the general population, most inmates have at some point penetrated the paid labor force U.

Department of Justice Given this instability, researchers must ad- dress both changes in work statuses over time and the temporal sequencing of work and crime. Third, despite solid observa- tional evidence showing strong effects of work on adult offending Sampson and Laubmost experimental efforts to reduce crime through employment have had null or disappointingly small treatment ef- fects Piliavin and Gartner 1 ; Sherman et al.

Although crime reduction among older offenders has sometimes been observed in financial aid programs Leni- han or employment projects Gartner and Piliavinadolescents generally. Taken together, existing theory and re- search point to a complex and perhaps con- ditional relation between work and criminal behavior.

Whether this relation is causal re- mains unresolved, as does the direction of causality. Employment has been conceptual- ized as a cause of crime and conformity Hagana spurious correlate Gott- fredson and Hirschiand as a proxy indicator of a latent causal factor Sampson and Laub These differing interpretations are partly due to the coinci- dence of employment with age and differing interpretations of the relationship between age and crime.

For most offenses in most societies, crime rates rise in the early teen years, peak dur- ing the mid- to late teens, and decline there- after Hirschi and Gottfredson Al- though the general contours of this "age- crime curve" are well established, the curve's interpretation has been hotly de- bated.Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc.

Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla. Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante. Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie.

Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat. Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula.

Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio. Browse Collections About Login Help. Advanced search. Print Send Add Share. Item Data. It examined the relationship between the participants' discourse practices and their performance, and determined how they validated their performances.

Data collected included observations, interviews, students' written reflective responses, a fieldwork journal, and a DVD of the performance. The findings revealed a complex performance community mediated by a set of discourse practices and tools, including a script and a video.It has not been subject to the Agency's peer and administrative review, and has as yet not been approved as an EPA document.

Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use by the U.

Environmental Protection Agency. The Composite Model for Landfills consists of a steady-state, one-dimensional numerical model that simulates flow in the unsaturated zone. The output from this module, seepage velocity as a function of depth, is used as input by the unsaturated zone transport module. The latter simulates one-dimensional vertical transport in the unsaturated zone and includes the effect of longitudinal dispersion, linear adsorption, and first-order decay.

Output from the unsaturated zone modules--i. The latter includes one-dimensional uniform flow, three- dimensional dispersion, linear adsorption, first-order decay, and dilution due to direct infiltration into the groundwater plume for the case of a Gaussian source. The fate and transport of contaminants in the various media depends on the chemical properties of the contaminants as well as a number of medium- and environment-specific parameters.

The uncertainty and spatial variability in these parameters is quantified using the Monte Carlo simulation technique. It also includes two sample input data sets and the corresponding outputs to further assist the user in setting up the data files. Finally, the manual Includes details of a program called Composite Cumulative Distribution Function CMPCDF that can be used to combine regional cumulative distribution functions with specified weights to yield the nationwide composite cumulative distribution function.

Atul M. Salhotra served as project manager for Woodward-Clyde Consultants. A number of individuals were Involved in the actual development of the computational codes and provided assistance to OSW. Zubair Saleem provided the overall guidance and technical advice. Other key individuals and companies involved in the implementation of the code include Dr. Jan Kool of HydroGeologic Inc. Michael Ungs of Tetratech, Inc.

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Carlos Marin, Amblotech; Dr. Zubair Saleem U. Washington D. CMNand sample input and output files. This program can be used to aggregate regional COFs cumulative distribution functions of a given variable to estimate nationwide composite CDF of the variable based on the total probability theorem. Further details of this program are Included in Section 4.Subsidiary of Science Applications, Inc. Sobotka and' Company, Inc. Each appendix includes a discussion of its data source, assumptions, and analytical methods, and is a support document for the RLA report.

Appendix A includes background information and thought processes which have resulted in the initiation and development of nationwide pretreatment programs. Consideration is given to the impact of industrial effluents on POTWs' performance, an assessment of Federal laws and regulations, the characteristics of POTWs subject to a pretreatment program, progress made to date by Federal, State and municipal governments toward implementation, and a summary assessment of State regulations affecting industrial waste control at POTWs.

This pretreatment program was developed initially to prevent upset problems caused by industrial waste at a POTW. The appendix reviews studies on POTWs performance, operation and maintenance, presence of toxics, air pollution, and worker health and safety.

Funded primarily by U. EPA, this review provides a sound basis for evaluating the qualitative impact of the various pretreatment strategies in the main report. Theanalyses and results from Appendix B also provide background information and a quantitative basis for several key POTW computer model assumptions see Appendix C. Appendix C includes the overview, development, program documentation and complete results from a computerized mathematical model constructed to assess the environmental, cost impacts, and benefits of pretreatment program alter- natives.

The POTW model reviews each of the 2, POTWs requiring pretreatment, determines and quantifies the pretreatment options for each, and then aggregates the results to estimate national impacts. The object is to provide theoretical benchmarks for estimating alternate benefit measures for diverse water uses. The Technical Problems Section, A-l, summarises the typical problems associated with industrial pollutants.

The Federal Legal section, A-2, provides a brief summary of each of the major environmental acts and highlights their relation to the pretreatment program. The purpose of Section A-2 is to provide a basis for understanding the reasons Congress directed EPA to develop pretreatment regulations and to lay the groundwork for assessing whether other environmental acts have the regulatory authority to carry out the intent of the pretreatment regulations.

The Federal Program has been in effect since February Since then, funds have been spent by governnent and industry to comply with these regulations. Section A-4 compiles data on the costs of program development x and implementation at the municipal, State and Federal level. In addition, it estimates the number of pretreattnent programs currently in effect as well as the status of pretreatment program implementation at the 2, POTWs. Section A-5 characterizes the role of the States in instituting environ- mental controls.

It also provides data for assessing likely State initiatives and actions in the absence of a Federal pretreatment program. The unit operations most commonly used to meet secondary treatment standards at POTWs are activated sludge and trickling filter operations.

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Additional BOD. These organisms are either present in a liquid phase, as in activated sludge, or attached to a growth medium such as rocks or plastics, as in the trickling filter operation.

The constituents including screenings, grit, scum and sludge removed by these operations are important waste products of the treatment process. The resulting sludge is usually in the form of a liquid or a semisolid liquid, which typically contains 0.

The technologies currently available for sludge stabilization include 1 chlorine oxidation, 2 lime stabilization, 3 heat treatment, 4 anaerobic digestion, and 5 aerobic digestion. The latter two are the roost conznon stabilization processes used at POTWs. Byproducts of these two stabilization processes include water, carbon dioxide, acaaonia, methane, and a solid material suitable for disposal.

The liquid byproducts can be recycled in a POTW for treatment and the gaseous byproducts can be vented and used for fuel.